executive summary wolf management plan

Working Copy of
April
2017 Draft Wolf Plan
Update
(11/17/
2017)
DRAFT
Oregon Wolf
Conservation and Management Plan
Page |
ii
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1
(
November
2017)
2
3
The
Oregon Wolf Conservation and Management Plan
(Plan) was first adopted in 2005 and updated in
4
2010. This update, which began in March 2016, is the result of a yearlong evaluation of the Plan.
5
Some of the
changes contained within this
Plan
are general updates and reorganization of content.
6
Other changes are more substantive in nature, and include management improvements based on
7
information gained over years of wolf management in Oregon
.
In general, changes made in this
Plan
8
include: 1) updates to base information (i.e., status, population, distribution, etc.), 2) new science
9
related to the biology and management of wolves, and 3) management improvements based on
10
information gained through years of wolf management in Ore
gon. Chapter II (Wolf Conservation
11
and Monitoring
) includes detailed information on the three phases of wolf management and
12
discusses the state’s two wolf management zones.
Chapter III (Wolf as Special Status Game
13
Mammal)
addresses the definition and con
ditions of the
Chapter
I
V
(Wolf

Livestock Conflicts)
14
includes information on the use of non

lethal deterrents, the use of controlled take in certain
15
situations, and expands livestock producer options for investigating potential wolf depredations of
16
liv
estock.
17
18
Readers should note that while some sections of earlier versions of this plan are condensed or
19
combined, earlier versions of this Plan will continue to be made available on the ODFW wolf
20
website at

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/Wolves/index.asp

.
21
22
The Plan’s goal remains the same:
23
24
To ensure the conservation of gray wolves as required by Oregon law while protecting the
25
social and economic interests of all Oregonians.
26
The 2005 Plan was originally crafted using an adaptive approach that requires periodic and formal
27
evaluation using in
formation gained through the actual management of wolves. The Oregon
28
Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) considered the following principles while reviewing and
29
updating the plan.
30

Adhere to the factors included in the 2015 delisting analysis when consi
dering any proposed
31
changes.
32

Maintain conservation focus for wolves in all population phases.
33

Maintain flexible management options of the 2005 Plan when addressing conflict as the wolf
34
population increases.
35

Address ODFW personnel and budget limitations w
hen evaluating future commitments.
36

Develop an effective workload sharing program with the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
37
(USFWS) to monitor expanding wolf populations and address wolf

livestock conflicts in the
38
federally listed portion of Oregon.
39
40
Gray Wo
lves (
Canis lupus
) were listed as endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act
41
(ESA) and the state ESA when the Plan was updated in 2010. Gray wolves were establishing their
42
populations in northeastern Oregon at that time; today, the status of wolv
es in the state is more complex. In 2011, the USFWS delisted the gray wolf from the federal ESA east of Oregon
1
Highways 395, 78, and 95 as part of the larger Northern Rocky Mountain Distinct Population
2
Segment; wolves west of this boundary remained federa
lly listed. In January 2015, the Oregon
3
conservation population objective was reached. The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission
4
(Commission) initiated a biological status review to determine if the species required continued
5
listing under the Oregon ESA.
That review led to the delisting of wolves in Oregon in November
6
2015. While these changes represent landmarks in the modern history of the gray wolf, this Plan
7
strives to provide continued conservation and effective management of wolves into the future.
8
The objectives and strategies contain
ed within this Plan are intended
to serve multiple
functions
into
9
the future

they provide
management
guidance
to address wolf

livestock conflicts
,
monitor wolf
10
population
and health factors
, evaluate
wolf
interactions
with native ungulate
and other carnivore
11
populations,
conduct wolf

related research,
and
address
wolf

human in
teractions
.
The Plan a
lso
12
identifies potential conservation threats
for managers to consider
when cons
idering a number of
13
management
a
ctivities
.
While
Oregon’s wolf population is predicted to continue to grow and
14
expand its distribution
,
it is unclear at this time what the
population and specific distribution
will be.
15
This Plan contains strategies which direct ODFW to
develop
a
detailed
and predictive
population
16
model which will
improve understanding of potential occurrence, habitat suitability, potential wolf
17
range, and will
inform the
development of future population and distribution goals
.
18
W
olves have reached Phase III popula
tion levels in eastern Oregon,
but
the states wolf population is
19
still
relatively small at this time.
W
olves
occur in both eastern O
regon forested areas, and
the f
orests
20
of the Cascade Mountains. However,
the extent they
will
successfully expand into
the Oregon coast
21
range
is undetermined.
T
his
Plan
strives to provide a framework by which the management of this
22
species may
, at some point in the future,
transition to a manag
ement approach similar to other
23
wildlife
in Oregon, while continuing to
recognize the
unique history of the species.

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